Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Combining Projects


I've long had a project that I've tinkered with I refer to as King Arthur w/Giant Robots, which has been a post-apocalyptic retelling of the King Arthur mythology with giant robots. The tabletop gaming group has grown at my work, so I was thinking of putting the game together for real and doing a playtest at work. In doing so I sort of refactored the background of the game to be more... fantastic sci-fi post-apocalyptic than mutants and radiation post apocalyptic. What can I say, I like Borderlands.

King Arthur with Giant Robots Pitch

The Empire Eternal retreated from the land of New Albion ten generations ago in the wake of diseases unknown, blights upon the land, and invasions from off-world by both the Saxons and Picts. No longer able to garrison the borders of the Empire with its legions and fleets, Emperor Constantine withdrew his forces from New Albion and other lands, leaving its people to fend for themselves. Only Uther Pendragon was able to stand against the invaders in his armour suit Caliburn, turning back the invaders so violently they would not return for a generation, but at the cost of his life. The time of peace his blood bought is coming to an end. The Saxons are returning to New Albion in force, and only scattered knights wielding the weapons of the Imperial Age stand in their path. Your village is home to such a knight and together you must step forward to defend your land, your people.

And on a distant hill the combat robot Caliburn waits sleeping for the next true ruler of New Albion to awaken it.

Summary

Last Knights of Camelot is a game about the survivors of an off world colony trying to survive in the face of alien environments, off world threats, and internal squabbles after the interstellar empire that founded the colony retracted its support generations ago. The players are the residents of a small settlement built among the ruins of terraforming equipment, industrial farms, and alien flora. The village is surviving but not quite prospering and is beset by threats which the players must deal with. The village’s strength is some manner of ancient war machine leftover from the height of the colony’s power. This war machine secures the village’s borders, gives it political clout in the region, and makes it far more important than one expect of a village its size. The players are the leaders of the village and have important roles in it, including operating and supporting the war machine.

Inspirations

Movies: Nausicaa of the Valley of the Winds, Excalibur, Fury Road
Television: Vision of Escaflowne
Books: Nausicaa of the Valley of the Winds
Games: Pendragon, A Song of Ice and Fire RPG, Mutant, Battletech, Mekton

Gameplay is broken into three main types of play:
  • Personal - Standard rpg play controlling your character through tense situations, social and physical conflicts, etc.
  • Battle - Fielding the warmachine and other forces in a large scale battle. Each player will have some resource to bring to bear in these conflicts.
  • Village - Between sessions and over any large stretches of in game time the players work to support and improve their village.
So that's the pitch and I started tinkering with a rules system, but then I got to thinking: could I do this with 5E? With the huge player base of 5E, seems like it could be a smart business move and at this point the system is pretty open to tinkering with. I had also been thinking lately about tinkering with in line with the Warhammer Fantasy RPGs version of Zero to Hero than D&D's Zero to Hero curve in the hopes of extending play in the level range where 5E really works for me (which I would say is around 3-8, just personal preference but I find levels 9+ to be too slow in combat, too much decision paralysis, etc).  

To that end I was thinking a 5E based system where the players worked there way through a succession of 5 level classes.  The classes available would be limited by what classes they've already completed and how players have chosen to upgrade their village; building a barracks opens up more combat oriented options. The goal would not be to limit characters, but to encourage them to work on the village (there should never be a situation where a player cannot advance into a good class due to the group choosing to do something else with the village). So a character's progress may be Peasant/Militia Member/Soldier/Master Swordsman/Officer, or Scribe/Hedge Mage/Student Mage/Wizard/Archmage.  Characters would level every session (maybe only for the first ten levels?) but each level would not be a huge increase in power.  This obviously would require a lot of writing work, but I think it would work well for fixing some of the criticisms I have of 5E while keeping it familiar enough for people to still "get it."    

The end result would hopefully be something like a sci-fi version of Beyond the Wall's hearth fantasy.  Low power level (except when the giant robot comes out), focus on the community, etc. I;d probably set it up so the first quest chain the players ended up on was powering up the war machine in their village, establishing the importance of the village in the region.  

TLDR: King Arthur with Giant Robots by way of 5E, Warhammer Fantasy, and Beyond the Wall. 


 



Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Catamaran: Ally Mechanics


Yeah, I'm posting a lot of Catamaran stuff this week because we're starting up again after a few weeks off due to family events and hurricanes. All that time has given me a chance to catch up with some of the rules I've been meaning to write to cover things that have come up in game.

One of these is a better way handle NPC allies in combat as the group of 6-8 PCs has accumulated twenty some odd NPC followers (3 from the Paladin's Noble background, one Paladin in training, one Monk in training, one old shipwright, and twenty one Vikings on the wrong side of the planet that were brought here as prisoner soldiers by one of the bad guy groups in the setting and freed by the players). There have been several situations, particularly on the party's ship where rolling for this mass of humanity was just overwhelming, so it kind of got forgotten. But I don't want them to be forgotten; the players have put a lot of effort and resources into recruiting some of these NPCs and I want it to pay off. They build a bigger boat largely to cart these guys around! While on the ship tasks like manning ballistas and such does alleviate some need for the NPCs to do something, it was not enough, so I came up with the following system after reading Harbringer of Doom's post about a similar idea a few months back.

In order to speed up combat, non-essential NPC allies will not function independently of the PCs, but instead "attach" to the players, granting buffs to PC actions rather than taking their own actions. This does not change the space the PC occupies (but we play loose with our maps and don't use a strict grid so this works for us).

Attaching requires the PC that the NPC is attaching to do spend a bonus action, but a single bonus action can attach multiple NPCs of the same group (so you must spend a bonus action to attach Hakon to you, but you can spend one bonus action to get three of the unnamed Vortlanders with you). You can only have a number of NPCs attached to you equal to your proficiency bonus plus your Charisma bonus.

I tried to have most of the NPCs have some sort of disadvantage, such as reducing movement or disadvantage on a skill, as long as they are attached to make the choice of attaching more interesting. The Vortlanders don't have this because attaching them means risking real damage to the effectiveness of the ship if they are rendered inactive (see below).

The NPCs with the group grant the following bonuses:
  • Siewal (Kel’s Squire): Gain 10 temp hit points, recovering from disarm or changing weapons is a free action, attacks of opportunity against you have disadvantage, disadvantage on your Stealth checks
  • Taben (Kel’s valet): Gain 3 temp hit points, Advantage on Healing and Persuasion checks, advantage on saves against charm effects, disadvantage on your Intimidation checks
  • Oska (Kel’s advisor): Gain 3 temp hit points, Advantage on History and Arcana checks, can spend a bonus action to double spell range, once per battle as a bonus action you can hand off a concentration spell to Oska so she can maintain it without the player character needing to, reduce your movement by 10 ft (she’s old)
  • Helsar (Paladin in Training): Gain 5 temp hit points, once per battle can heal 5 hit points or 1 disease/poison as a bonus action, advantage on Nature checks
  • Geph the Scalefolk (Monk in Training): Gain 10 temp hit points, Advantage on Athletics checks, when hit with a weapon attack use a reaction to reduce damage by 1d8
  • Hakon (Viking Healer): Gain 10 temp hit points, Advantage on Religion and Medicine skill checks, treat 1s and 2s as 3s on any healing dice used on you, advantage on saves against frighten effects
  • Steinar (Viking Warleader): Gain 10 temp hit points, advantage on Perception checks, you can make a melee attack as a reaction to being hit in melee, advantage on saves against frighten effects
  • Vortlander (Vikings): Gain 5 temp hit points, advantage on saves against frighten effects
If the temp hit points granted by an NPC are used up in a fight, the NPC cannot attach again (including to the ship) until the group has taken a long rest. I'm considering a system where NPCs that lose all their hit points have to make some sort of death save or die, but that seems to harsh.  Another option is requiring a death save if the player they are attached to makes a death save, and if the NPC fails it they die.

Alternately they can attach to the ship and are assumed to be attached to the ship if they are not attached to a player.
  • Between the Vortlanders and Geph there are 23 skilled sailor NPCs. If enough NPCs are attached to PCs that eight or fewer are left to crew the boat, the boat is undermanned and suffers disadvantage on all checks, plus -5 ft speed penalty per crewmember missing. 
  • Every three NPCs over the nine minimum to crew the ship will allow one ballista to fire every other round. Thus 18 NPCs are needed to crew the ship to full effectiveness and keep all three ballistas manned. 
  • Every NPC above the 18 minimum adds +1 to proficiency (water vehicles) checks for the ship or +1 to ballista attacks (which are currently at +4 to hit and do 6d6 damage).


Sunday, September 17, 2017

Catamaran Special Materials and Magic Item Creation System

Materials

In Catamaran the players don't get magic items that grant bonuses; they get those through the Glory system.  They have gotten weapons made of special materials though, that have the following advantages:
  • Adamantium
    • Weapons: Treat damage rolls of 1 or 2 as 3.  
    • Helmet: Ignore two crit hits per long rest
    • Armor: As per DMG
  • Mithral
    • Weapons: Treat damage rolls of 1 as 2
    • Helmet: Ignore one crit hit per long rest
    • Armor: As per DMG
    • Shield: As a reaction can grant advantage on a save vs. spell once per long rest
  • Ironwood: Wood as hard, if not harder, than iron.
    • Weapons: Treat damage rolls of 1 as 2
    • Shield: Plant creatures have disadvantage attacking the wielder
    • Ship: Increases ship AC without increasing weight, taking up cargo space, etc
  • Burnwood: Wood that burns with normal intensity but a fist sized piece will burn for longer than a human lifespan.  
    • Weapons: Bonus action to light on fire, add Dex bonus in fire damage to melee attacks.  
  • Liftwood: Flying wood that naturally levitates up to its own weight at 5 feet per round.  
    • Ship: When built into the hull of a ship it increases the speed of the ship by reducing drag and how deep the ship sits in the water.  
  • Skysteel: Found in meteors.  Highly magnetic.  
    • Weapon: +1d6 damage against constructs
    • Shield: Constructs have disadvantage attacking the wielder
  • Eog: Special enchanted glass that is harder than steel and spirits cannot penetrate.
    • Weapon: +1d6 vs noncorporeal creatures
    • Shield: Noncorporeal creatures have disadvantage attacking the wielder
  • Orachalum: A special gold/mithral alloy with magical uses.
    • Weapon: Ignore spell based defenses, like stoneskin or shield.  
    • Armor: Gain advantage on spell saving throws.  
    • Shield: As a reaction gain advantage on a spell saving throw
  • Moonkelp Treated Whalebone:
    • Weapon: +1d6 damage against any creature not in its true form (lycanthropes, wild shape druids, etc).  
Plus I told the players they were useful in making magic items.  So they asked about making magic items.  

Magic Item Creation

  • This is a system I'm still in the process of hacking together so it's just a series of bullet points right now, but still any feedback welcome.
  • Magic items are created by spellcasters sacrificing spell slots of at least third level for a period of a month to generate points that are then used to purchase magical traits for items. 
  • To make an item the character must have a specific item they are making and all components needed, along with necessary tools. During the creation process they must have access to the item for at least 2 hours a day. If the character misses a day, they lose all progress for that month. If they miss five days in a row, all progress is lost and they must start over again, though all components and materials remain. 
  • Any spellcaster can sacrifice spell slots to make magic items, but they can only be used to create items that line up with the magical focus of the spellcaster. For example, clerics could make items tied to their domain or more general cleric abilities (like healing), while sorcerers could make items that are more related to their bloodline and its abilities.
    • Wizards and bards get more wide range of magic item options here, but they are still limited by their core spell competencies. For example, wizards cannot make healing items. 
    • If an item allows the use of a specific spell, you must know that spell to create the item. For example, if you want to create a Helm of Telepathy you must know detect thoughts. 
  • If a spellcaster sacrifices a spell slot for a month, they get magical resource points. These points come in three categories: minor, moderate, and major. Enchantments require a specific number of these points. 
    • Spell slot sacrificed:
    • 3rd Level: 1 Minor enchantment point
    • 4th Level: 2 Minor enchantment points
    • 5th Level: 3 Minor enchantment points or 1 moderate enchantment point
    • 6th Level: 2 moderate enchantment points
    • 7th Level: 3 moderate enchantment points or 1 major enchantment point
    • 8th Level: 2 major enchantment points
    • 9th Level: 3 major enchantment points
  • Non spellcasters that have Expertise in a crafting tool can get enchantment points if they make an item from a special material and sacrifice hit dice instead of spell slots. So a smith can make a magic weapon without using magic by sacrificing his own lifeforce and using a special material like mithral.  
    • Sacrifice 3 hit dice: 1 minor enchantment point
    • Sacrifice 8 hit dice: 1 moderate enchantment point
    • Sacrifice 18 hit dice: 1 major enchantment point
  • Ability score points can also be permanently sacrificed, 1 ability score point for one major enchantment point. Ability scores may not be lowered below 8 in such fashion without GM approval.  
  • If a character who has sacrificed spell slots or hit dice uses those sacrificed resources for any reason, such as being stuck in a life or death situation, all enchantment points for that month are lost. 
  • Multiple characters can sacrifice spell slots and hit dice for a single item as long as they have access to it each day for at least two hours a day. If access is lost, the enchantments points for that month are lost. 
  • When a player decides to make an item, they must detail out the item before it is made to figure out its point cost, and then acquire the requisite enchantment points. You do not generate a pool of points and then spend it. Magic is a thing of ritual and process, not an ad hoc free for all. Magic items are useless until the full number of points necessary are obtained. 
  • Once an item is completed, additional enchantment points must be added, but this requires an additional enchantment point of the largest type being added to be spent “reopening” the magic in the item. So if you are adding an enchantment to an item that requires two minor and one moderate enchantment point, you must spend an additional moderate enchantment point to The item will be unusable until the new enchantments are finished. 
  • The type and number of points that can be put into an item are limited by its material and form:
    • Material:
      • Steel, Bone: Minor enchantment points only
      • Wood, Obsidian, Silver, Gold, Adamantine, Eog, Skysteel: Minor or moderate enchantment points, +5 total enchantment point. Generally cost x10 times the normal cost for the item. 
      • Mithral, Legendary Bones, Ironwood, Burnwood, Magewood: Minor, moderate, or major enchantment points, +10 total enchantment points. Generally cost x100 times the normal cost for the item. 
    • Item
      • Weapon/Shield: 5
      • Ring: 4
      • Armor: 10
      • Staff: 10
      • Wand: 5
      • Rod: 7
      • Casting Implement: 5
      • Helmet/Hat: 5
      • Cloak/Robe: 5
      • Amulet: 4
  • Ritual Components
    • Minor Enchantment Points x10 resource goods
    • Moderate Enchantment points x10 trade goods
    • Major Enchantment Points x10 luxury goods
    • Some magic items may be consumed for additional enchantment points. Generally this the same number of points used to create the item reduced by one category. This means items created using minor enchantment points are not salvageable. 
  • All items created through this system require attunement unless they are single use items. 
  • Item categories:
    • Activate spell:
      • You must know the spell
      • Costs 1 minor for 1-3rd level spells, 1 moderate for 4-5th level spells, and 1 major for 6th level spells. You can’t make items that produce higher level spells.
      • If the item can cast more than one spell you must pay the above cost for each spell. 
      • This is for a once per long rest item. 
      • For an item to be an “at will” item you must spend x10 time the number of enchantment points needed to make the item. 
      • Each additional charge you want the item to have charges, you must spend on additional point of the highest type for each charge. So if you are making a wand that can cast 1st and a 4th level spell, costing a minor and a moderate enchantment point, each additional charge requires a moderate enchantment point. 
  • Specific Point Costs:
    • Resistance Brooches: Gain resistance to one element that just hit you as a reaction until beginning of your next turn. 1 minor enchantment point.
    • Leadership Brooches: Grant Charisma Bonus + Level in temp hit points to all allies as bonus action. 2 moderate enchantment points. 
    • Weightless Shoes: Walk on any surface as if you weighed nothing. 2 minor enchantment points. 
    • All Minor Properties in the DMG: 1 minor enchantment point. 
    • Alchemy Jug: 8 moderate enchantment point
    • Amulet of Health: 6 moderate enchantment points
    • Amulet Against Proof of Detection and Location: 10 minor enchantment points
    • Amulet of the Planes: 3 major enchantment points
    • Animated Shield: 10 moderate enchantment points
    • Armor of Invulnerability: 10 moderate enchantment points and 2 major enchantment points. 
    • Armor of Resistance: 10 minor enchantment points
    • Arrow Catching Shield: 10 minor enchantment points
    • Arrow of Slaying: 1 moderate enchantment point
    • Bag of holding: 5 minor enchantment points
    • Bag of Beans: 4 minor enchantment points
    • Wand of Fireballs: 8 minor enchantment points

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Catamaran: Scroll-Bearer Prestige Class

Through some oddities in my Catamaran campaign the players got their hands on artifact called the All Scroll that contains all knowledge in the world within it's endless length.  It's a hugely powerful artifact, but it's like having access to the internet without a search engine; everything you want to know is in there somewhere, but good luck finding it!  The party rogue, who is using my gadgeteer Scientist subclass to be a gun toting, bomb chunking agent of reason, has decided to take up the artifact despite being warned it may change him.  Not wanting to make it just another piece of equipment, I've written up a prestige class he can take to represent the powers gained from taking on the roll of the Bearer of the All Scroll.  I realize prestige classes in 5E are still a bit of an oddity, and I don't want to get back to the prestige class glut of 5E, but I think this is pretty much the story focused sort of stuff that prestige classes could do really well.  


Artifact Prestige Class: Scroll-Bearer
Artifacts in the Sea of Keruna are not simply powerful magical items that you can bind to and use at your leisure; they are immensely powerful items that change their bearer over time to become the best match to the artifacts power. One does not wield an artifact; one uses it and tries not to be too changed by the price that must be paid. Or if the price is already something the bearer of the artifact is willing to pay, then the partnership may just work out for all involved, but such is rarely the case.

The Scroll of All is such an artifact. Technically there are two Scrolls of All, but one is kept in the Land of the Dead so it may remain organized. Each Scroll of All contains all information in the world somewhere in its infinite length, but finding the right information when you want it is a major undertaking. As the bearer gets more adept at using the Scroll of All they can find information faster and even manipulate the scroll itself.
 
Prerequisites
  • Intelligence: 13
  • Level: 5+
  • Skills: Trained in 4 skills


Level
Features
1
Infinite Search, Applied Knowledge
2
Comprehend Text, Ritual of the Scroll
3
Moving Words, Applied Knowledge, Innate Knowledge
4
Expand Your Mind, Nondetection
5
Scroll Walk, Applied Knowledge

Class Features
As an scroll bearer, you gain the following class features.
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + your Constitution modifier per scroll bearer level
Tools: Calligrapher’s tools
Saving Throws: None
Skills: None

Infinite Search
If you can take a short rest to research the subject of a skill check in the scroll, such as looking an historical incident as part of a History check, you have advantage on any skill checks involving the related skill. You may only do this for one skill check per short rest. If you choose to use this ability outside of a rest, it requires one hour to use. This can only be used for finding knowledge, not performing an action relating to a skill. 
 
Applied Knowledge
At 1st, 3rd, and 5th level you may select one of the following upgrades to your existing abilities:
  • Add one spellcasting level as if you had gained a level as a multiclass spellcaster. 
  • Add one superiority, cunning, bardic inspiration, or other special die to your existing die pool.
  • Train in one skill or tool. 
  • Gain expertise, doubling your proficiency bonus, with one skill or tool you are already proficient in. 
Ritual of the Scroll
At 2nd level, you gain the ability to cast the following spells as if you had the Ritual Casting feat: Clairvoyance, Darkvision, Detect Magic, Detect Evil and Good, Detect Poison and Disease, Detect Thoughts, Identify, Locate Animals or Plants, Locate Object, See Invisibility, Tongues.

At 4th level, you gain the ability to cast the following spells as if you had the Ritual Casting feat: Divination, Find the Path, Legend Lore, Locate Creature, Scrying, True Seeing.

Comprehend Text
Beginning at 2nd level, you can read any language and have advantage on any skill or ability checks to decode written puzzles, riddles, etc. 
 
Innate Knowledge
At 3rd level, you may cast any of the spells you can cast through Ritual of the Scroll as normal spells. You may do so a total of 1+ your Intelligence bonus times, and this resets each long rest. 
 
Moving Words
Beginning at 3rd level, you can manipulate the physical form of the scroll, allowing you to scan through it without touching it, levitate it, and even move other items with it. You can effectively cast Mage Hand and Levitate at will, but must use the scroll to do any lifting or manipulation involved. These spells originate from the scroll, so to levitate yourself you must hold onto the scroll, but they may be cast from up to 30 feet away from the scroll. 
 
Expand Your Mind
At 4th level, the scroll has reordered your brain sufficiently that it operates much more efficiently now. You gain a +2 to your Intelligence. 
 
Nondetection
Beginning at 4th level, you can modify information around you to make it impossible to track you through magic. You can cast Nondetection a number of times per day equal to your 1+ your Intelligence bonus. While this spell is active, others suffer disadvantage on Perception checks to find you. 
 
Scroll Walk
Beginning at 5th level, you can set the scroll on the ground, kick it to get it rolling, and cause it to leap up into the sky, creating a path you can move along. This effectively gives you a fly speed equal to your normal movement rate. Activating this power requires a action. It may be ended at any time, though if you end it while not on the ground you will take falling damage. If you are rendered helpless while using this power you do not fall to the ground as the scroll will continue to float under your body.

Design Commentary
It's supposed to represent having access to massive amounts of information, but not always being able to find what you need.  At the same time, I didn't want to completely stymie advancement in your core character class, thus Applied Knowledge.  I worry that Applied Knowledge is too good.  It can grant a three dice within five levels, and it can open up the door for non-rogues to get expertise, but everything else this class does is gather information (or do some weird stuff with your scroll).  Having some more active elements I think is necessary.  

Expand Your Mind is meant to be a replacement for an ability score increase, only you don't get to choose where it goes, thus backing up the fiction that joining with the scroll changes you.  I worry I don't have enough fiction backing that element up, but not sure how to do so and have it be fun.  I may add some more find information type abilities, but have the player have to pay in exhaustion to use them.  

The 4th level upgrade of Ritual of the Scroll may be too good as it lets you theoretically cast some higher level spells at 9th level.  None of them are battle winners, but they are adventure derailers.

Moving Words and Scroll Walk are the result of some weird descriptions of the NPC they met in the land of the dead who had the other scroll.  She used it for transport, as a shield, etc.  The shield part did not make it into this writeup.  

The All-Scroll
The All-Scroll is a massive parchment scroll two feet in length and about a foot thick.   The wood is sandalwood and the parchment is uniform and neat.  The writing in the All-Scroll is always understood by whoever looks at it and includes diagrams, maps, and symbols as needed.  The text is always neat, compact, and legible.  Once you begin unrolling the scroll it can be unrolled infinitely with new text and information appearing on each section as you unroll it.  If you are not bound to it, you must unroll the scroll continually until you find the information you are looking for, a process that may take years if you are successful at all as the scroll contains all knowledge in the world (specifically everything known now or every by a mortal; it does not hold information about scientific principles not yet discovered, the secrets only known by gods, etc).  If you are bound to it, you can move the information around by touching the scroll and even call up that information you need.  Even with this, it is very difficult to use.

The All-Scroll is immune to damage.  It will automatically roll up if it loses contact with its current user.










Tuesday, July 25, 2017

New Catamaran Class: Unraveler


In my 5E Catamaran campaign there are only twenty-five wizards in the world at one time; each time one is killed their "mage spark" goes to a mortal of suitable intelligence and knowledge (the specifics of this have been left purposefully vague), allowing that mortal to become a wizard. It is possible for a wizard to use so much of their power that they weaken their spark or force it to leave entirely, or for others to forcefully harvest a mage spark from a wizard given the right knowledge and willingness to commit acts of terrible torture. So of course one of the bad guy groups in the campaign, the Stormfeather order, is going around harvesting all the mage sparks it can and cramming them into the order's leader. Those who survive this removal process become what is called an unraveler; the void left by the mage spark allows them to actively consume and destroy magic, and the Stormfeather order brainwashes those poor unfortunates who survive the harvesting process into anti-magic footsoldiers that are really effective against spellcasters. These unravelers started out as a monster type, but a player got his mage spark weakened by being part of a ritual to cast a really high level spell, so I gave him the option to become an unraveler as it made a lot of sense for his character (he is a wizard who hates the Stormfeather order for killing his family). That led to me writing up unraveler as a base class unto itself, presented below.

This class would only work in campaigns where the players run into enough spellcasters to feel useful. The weird decision for obviously supernatural monster abilities to not be "magic" makes unravelers pretty focused on actual spellcasters, but I think it could work out. It certainly is not as universally useful a base class as fighter or rogue, but I think in the right campaign it could be a lot of fun.

My continuing design concerns:

  • Not all the abilities are finished, as denoted by the TBD sections.  
  • Some of the dedication abilities are really specific, such that they may not come into play much.  
  • Originally the class was designed such that getting hit with spells gave you points to spend to do cool stuff, but that was not fun as you had to wait for others to act in order to be awesome and gave the class a completely different power curve in combat than other classes (i.e. the longer the fight goes on, the more powerful I get, rather than the reverse).  Thus it now uses a system where doing cool stuff gets you points, but getting too many points is bad, and getting hit with spells (among other things) reduces your point total.  Thus far this seems to be more fun.  
  • It is a defense heavy class... which is weird.  


Unraveler

A human bounty hunter carves his way through the cultists of the dark god that tried to sacrifice him years before, now able to nullify their magics if not turn them to his own use.

An elf knight charges across a battlefield, turning aside spell and cantrip alike, as she closes on the dark elf archmage that has invaded her people’s territory. His vast arcane power will not avail him against her unravelling.

An orc warrior forces a druid to return to her humanoid form from that of a direbear, cutting her off from the primal forces that power her magic. The orcs tribe will not be pushed off their land again.

All these warriors are unravelers, able to marshal their total lack of magical power to confound and defeat their enemies. Found in all races and cultures, unravelers are extremely rare, but highly prized by those who know how to put their unique skills to use.

Born Without Magic

Not all sentient beings possess the innate spark that allows them to pursue the wizardly arts, or the touch of the divine that gives rise to clerics. Some simply have no magical talents, instead spending their days in more mundane pursuits, but others have the opposite of magical talent. They do not have even the barest spark of magic in their spirit, instead having a void. A lack. A missing piece of their being has left them forever unable to wield magic power of any stripe, opening the path of the unraveler to them. These unravelers learn to put their special status to use for their own ends; power, wealth, defending family, the same things that drive us all.

Unraveled by Mortal Deeds

Other unravelers come to their powers later in life due to events that strip them of all magic essence. Some of these unravelers are normal people who suffer extraordinary events, such as arcane torture, exposure to dead gods, or a deal with a devil gone wrong. These individuals often take up the path of the unraveler in the hopes of getting revenge for what was done to them; they can never be complete again, but now they have the tools to be the best hunters possible of those who did them wrong. Due to their rarity and the pain that often accompanies their creation, unravelers are rare and are often the tools of others instead of being masters of their own fate. In these situations where unravelers are used as tools, unravelers that manage to free themselves often wreak terrible vengeance on those who thought them the unravelers master.

Creating an Unraveler

When creating an unraveler, the most important thing to consider is how your unraveler came by their abilities. Were they born without any spark of magic, and if so why? Or did they suffer some fate later in life that removed their natural magical energies? Do they welcome their abilities, or regret them? What led you to become an adventurer, and what are your goals as an adventurer?

Note: You cannot multiclass into unraveler if you have levels in any class with spellcasting abilities, a race with innate spellcasting abilities, or have a feat that grants spellcasting abilities without some event that strips you of these abilities. If you have levels in a class with spellcasting abilities but somehow are stripped of those abilities, you can convert those class levels into unraveler levels. Similarly, if you have a feat that grants spellcasting abilities but are stripped of your magic, you may choose a new feat. Once you take levels in unraveler you cannot take levels in any class with spellcasting abilities or take feats that grant spellcasting abilities.


Level
Proficiency Bonus
Features
Cantrips Known
Dedication Spells Known
Unraveler Spells Known
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
1
+2
Unraveling Dedication, Unraveling, Absorb Spell
-
-
-
-




2
+2
Unravelling Spellcasting, Unraveler Fighting Style
2
-
2
2




3
+2
Spellparry
2

2
2




4
+2
Ability Score Improvement
2

3
3




5
+3
Extra Attack, Arcane Sense
2

3
4
2



6
+3
Spell Evasion, Cannibalize Power
2

4
4
2



7
+3
Dedication Feature
2

4
5
3



8
+3
Ability Score Improvement
2

5
5
3



9
+3
Absorb Spell (5’)
3

5
5
4
2


10
+4
Channel Power
3
2
6
5
4
2


11
+4
Unsettling
3
2
6
5
5
3


12
+4
Ability Score Improvement
3
3
7
5
5
3


13
+4
Dedication Feature
3
3
7
5
5
4
2

14
+4
Drain Spells
3
4
8
5
5
5
2

15
+5
Consume Magic
3
4
8
5
5
5
3

16
+5
Ability Score Improvement
3
5
9
5
5
5
3

17
+5
Dedication Feature
3
5
9
5
5
5
4
2
18
+5
Absorb Spell (10’)
3
6
10
5
5
5
4
2
19
+5
Ability Score Improvement
4
6
10
5
5
5
5
3
20
+6
Spellbreaker
4
7
11
5
5
5
5
3

Class Features

As an unraveler, you gain the following class features.
Hit Points Hit Dice: 1d10 per unraveler level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 10 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d10 (or 6) + your Constitution modifier per unraveler level after 1st
Proficiencies Armor: Light and medium armor, shields
Weapons: Simple weapons, martial weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: As determined by your unraveler dedication.
Skills: Choose two from History, Intimidation, Investigation, Medicine, Persuasion, Perception. You get an additional skill proficiency from your unraveler dedication. 

Unraveler Dedication

At 1st level you select your unraveler dedication, which determines what type of magic user you specialize in hunting. This is usually determined by what led you to becoming an unraveler; was your family killed by wizards, or did the cleric of a dark god wrong you in the past? Your chosen dedication grants you features at 1st, 7th, 13th, and 17th level.
Unraveling
At 1st level, you learn how to harness your interior magical void, using it to aid you against magical effects.  You can activate various abilities gained from this class, each of which adds unraveler points to your character.  At 1st level,unraveler points can be spent in the following ways:
  • As a bonus action, gain one unraveler point to give yourself temporary hit points equal to your spellcasting ability score bonus.   You can gain a number of unraveler points equal to your proficiency bonus in a single bonus action.   These temporary hit points are lost when you take a short rest.  
  • As a bonus action, gain one unraveler point and treat one weapon you wield as magic until the beginning of your next turn.
  • As a bonus action, gain one unraveler point and give yourself advantage on a saving throw against a spell or magical effect already active on you, such as hold person.  If you are under a spell that has inflicted the stunned condition on you, you may use this option despite the fact you are stunned, but it is your only action for your turn.  
  • As a reaction when making a saving throw against a spell or magical effect, you can gain one unraveler point to give yourself advantage on the saving throw.
You lose these unraveler points in the following ways:
  • When you are hit with spells you lose one unraveler point per spell level, but you can never have fewer than 0 unraveler points.  
  • As a bonus action you can either consume a use or charge of a magic item or render a magic item inert until your next long rest to reduce your unraveler points by 1d6.  You must be attuned to the item.  
If your unraveler points are greater than your spellcasting ability score at beginning of your turn, you suffer 1d6 necrotic damage that ignores resistances, immunities, and temporary hit points.  If your unraveler points are greater than the sum of your spellcasting ability score and your proficiency bonus at  the beginning of your turn, you suffer 2d6 necrotic damage that ignores resistances, immunities, and temporary hit points. If your unraveler points are greater than the sum of your spellcasting ability score, your proficiency bonus, and your level, you suffer one level of exhaustion.  
If you take a short or long rest, your unraveler points are reduced to 0.  
Absorb Spell
At 1st level you gain the ability to try to absorb spells that hit adjacent allies as a reaction.  Doing so gives the target advantage on their saving throw, and if they save successfully you lose unraveler points as if you had been hit by the spell.  
Beginning at 9th level, when you successfully save against a spell that has multiple targets, you may use your reaction to give all targets within 5’ advantage on their saving throws against that spell.  Beginning at 18th level, this expands to 10’.
Unravelling Spellcasting
Beginning at 2nd level, you have learned to harness your unravelling powers to effectively cast spells, mimicking common magical effects used by other spellcasters through destroying magical energy.  
Cantrips
At 2nd level, you know two cantrips of your choice from the unraveler spell list. You learn additional unraveler cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Unraveler table.
Spell Slots
The Unraveler table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these unraveler spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest. For example, if you know the 1st-level spell shield and have a 1st-level and a 2nd-level spell slot available, you can cast shield using either slot.
Spells Known of 1st Level and Higher
You know two 1st-level spells of your choice from the unraveler spell list. The Spells Known column of the Unraveler table shows when you learn more unraveler spells of your choice. Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots. For instance, when you reach 5th level in this class, you can learn one new spell of 1st or 2nd level. Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the unraveler spells you know and replace it with another spell from the unraveler spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.
Spellcasting Ability
Your spellcasting ability is determined by your dedication, as listed below.  You use that ability whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use that ability modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a unraveler spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your ability modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your ability modifier
Spellcasting Focus
You can use an unravelers totem as a spellcasting focus for your unraveler spells.
Unraveler Fighting Style
At 2nd level, you adopt a style of fighting that incorporates your unraveler abilities as your specialty. Choose one of the following options.
Bolt Slinging
You gain a +2 bonus to attack rolls you make with cantrips.  
Distraction
When wielding a melee weapon with two hands, you can specify one hostile creature adjacent to a you that you can see as a bonus action each round.  Until the end of its next turn, that creature suffers disadvantage on all spell attack rolls and targets of its spells have advantage on their saving throws against those spells.  
Interference
When you make a successful ranged weapon attack against a target maintaining concentration, the target has disadvantage on their Constitution save to maintain concentration.  If the target fails its Constitution saving throw, it takes takes force damage equal to your spellcasting ability score bonus.   
Spell Shield
When wielding a shield, as a reaction to an adjacent ally being hit by a spell attack roll made by an enemy you can see, you can impose a penalty on spell attack rolls against that character equal to your spellcasting ability score bonus until the beginning of your next turn.  If the attack still hits, your ally has resistance to that spell’s damage.    
Spellparry
Beginning at 3rd level, when you are targeted with a spell attack roll, you can spend your reaction to increase your Armor Class by your spellcasting ability score until the beginning of your next turn, but only against cantrips and spells.  
Ability Score Improvement
When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can’t increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.
Extra Attack
Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the action on your turn.
Magic Sense
The presence of magic registers on your senses like the pressure of a storm about to strike. As an action, you can open your awareness to detect such forces. Until the end of your next turn, you know the location of any constructs, undead, fey, or elementals within 60 feet of you. You know the type (construct, undead, fey, or elemental) of any being whose presence you sense, but not its identity. Within the same radius, you also detect the presence of any place that has an active spell on it, such as a teleport circle, antimagic field, etc. You can use this feature a number of times equal to 1 + your spellcasting ability modifier. When you finish a long rest, you regain all expended uses.
Spell Evasion
Beginning at 6th level, you can use your unravel powers to deflect area of effect spells away from you. When you are subjected to an spell effect that allows you to make a saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail.  
Cannibalize Power
Beginning at 6th level, you can consume your unraveler spell slots to reduce your unraveler points by the level of the spell consumed as a bonus action.
Channel Power
Beginning at 10th level, you know a limited number of spells drawn from the spell list for the class which your dedication specializes in, so at 10th level God Killers select two spells from the cleric list.  These spells cannot be higher in level than your highest unraveler spell slot.  Also you can gain unraveler points to take these additional actions.  
  • Cast a spell from your available dedication spells, following the normal rules for that spell,  gaining one unraveller point per spell level.  
  • Beginning at 15th level, gain 6 unraveler points to cast one of the following spells using the normal rules for that spell: Forbiddance, Globe of Invulnerability, True Seeing
  • Beginning at 17th level, gain 7 unraveler points to cast one of the following spells using the normal rules for that spell: Sequester
  • Beginning at 19th level, gain 8 unraveler points to cast one of the following spells using the normal rules for that spell: Anti-Magic Shell, Feeblemind, Mind Blank
Unsettling
Beginning at 11th level, your lack of innate magical spark is so striking that others find it disconcerting, if not out right frightening.  People can feel there is something “wrong” about you by just looking at you.  You can gain an unraveler point as a bonus action to get advantage on an Intimidation check.  
Drain Spells
Beginning at 14th level, you can drain spells from those you strike in combat.  When you hit an enemy who can cast spells with a melee or ranged weapon attack, you can spend a bonus action and gain an unraveler point to try and drain spells from the target.  The target must make a Wisdom saving throw against your spellcasting DC; if this save fails, the victim loses one of their lowest level unexpended spell slots and you gain lose one unraveler point per spell level.  If the Wisdom save is successful, no spells are lost.
Consume Magic
At 15th level you gain the ability to subsist on magical power alone.  If you lose three unraveler points due to spells being cast on you, you do not need food or water for that day.  If you lose six unraveler points due to spells being cast on you, you gain advantage on all Constitution saves against inclement weather, including extremes of hot and cold, until your next long rest.
Spellbreaker
At 20th level you become the incarnation of anti-magic, becoming permanently magic resistant. You have  advantage on all saving throws against spells, all spell attack rolls against you have disadvantage, and you reduce your unraveler point total by one at the beginning of each of your turns.

Unraveler Dedications

Your ability to undo magic comes with a particular focus, making you more effective against a specific type of magic.  This may be a result of how you gained your unraveler powers, such as gaining the dedication of a godkiller by bathing in the blood of a dead deity, or could be a product of specific training.  
Beast Slayer
Beast Slayers seek to end the power of the druids, seeing these magicians of the primal world as nothing but a threat to themselves, their people, mortalkind, etc. Some Beast Slayers are from urban areas and see druids as impediments to the growth of civilization, while others are from rural areas and have more personal grudges against druids; not every druid is a kindly nature guardian and more than a few subscribe to the power of blood sacrifices.  
Primal Hunter
At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Nature skill and Wisdom and Intelligence saving throws.  Your spellcasting ability score is Wisdom.   
As a reaction to being hit, you can gain an unraveler point to gain resistance to any of the following damage types until the beginning of your next turnt: poison, lightning, fire.  
As a bonus action, you can gain unraveler points up to your proficiency bonus to gain +1d6 force damage per unraveler point to a single melee, ranged, or cantrip attack made against a target with druid spellcasting abilities or the beast or fey creature types. This damage bonus may be added to an attack after the attack hits.  
You lose 1d4 unraveler points when you reduce a target with druid spellcasting abilities or the beast or fey creature types to 0 hit points, but to use this ability you must kill the target.
Talonbreak
Beginning at 7th level, you can gain unraveler points to do the following:
  • As a reaction when hit by an attack using natural weapons (bite, claw, tentacle, beak, tail, etc), gain two unraveler point to gain resistance to slashing, bludgeoning, and piercing damage from natural weapons until the beginning of your next turn.  
  • As a bonus action, gain one unraveler point to ignore any difficult terrain created by magical effects until the beginning of your next turn.  
True Form
At 13th level you gain the ability to force creatures not in their true form to revert to their true form, whether they were changed by spell, monster ability, or by a druid’s wildshape ability.  As an action, you can gain three unraveler points to force a target within 60 feet not in their true form to make a Wisdom saving throw against your spellcasting DC; if they fail the saving throw they revert to their original form immediately as if the spell or ability used to change shape had ended and the target is stuck in its true form until it takes a short rest.  If the target succeeds at the saving throw, it retains its altered form.  If the creature is in its true form when this ability is used and it fails its save, it may not change shape until it completes a short rest.  
Primal Endings
Beginning at 19th level, as long as you have five or more unraveler points, allies within 30 feet of you are immune to magically created difficult terrain and have advantage on saving throws against poison and charm effects.  
God Killer
God Killers have been wronged by the gods or their agents and now seek to end their presence in this world.  Some God Killers only oppose a single god and its followers, while others hate the concept of divinity itself and seek to end the interference of any divine being in the mortal world.  
Divine Hunter
At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Religion skill and Wisdom and Charisma saving throws.  Your spellcasting ability score is Wisdom.  
As a reaction to being hit, you can spend an unraveler point to gain radiant damage resistance until the beginning of your next turn.
As a bonus action, you can gain unraveler points to gain +1d6 force damage per unraveler point to a single melee, ranged, or cantrip attack made against a target with cleric spellcasting abilities or the fiend or celestial creature types.  This damage bonus may be added to an attack after the attack hits. You may gain up to your proficiency bonus in unraveler points in a single bonus action using this ability.  
You lose 1d4 unraveler points when you reduce a target with cleric spellcasting abilities or the celestial or fiend creature types to 0 hit points, but to use this ability you must kill the target.
Block Divinity
Beginning at 7th level, you can spend unraveler points to do the following:
  • As a reaction when the use of a channel divinity ability is declared within 30 feet of you, spend two unraveler points to attempt to block it.  This requires the creature trying to use channel divinity to make a Wisdom save against your spellcasting DC; if this save fails the channel divinity ability fails to activate but is still consumed.  
  • As a reaction to spells or channel divinity being used for healing within 30 feet of you, spend two unraveler points to reduce the effectiveness of all healing due to spells or channel divinity used within 30 feet of you by half until the beginning of your next turn.
Drain Divinity
Beginning at 13th level, when any clerical spell is cast within 30 feet of you but does not target you, you lose one unraveler point.  
Shield of the Godless
Beginning at 19th level, as long as you have five or more unraveler points, allies within 30 feet of you have advantage on saving throws against clerical spells and resistance to radiant damage.  
Line Ender
You hunt those born with the gifts of sorcerous blood, seeking those who abuse the powers of their ancestors for their own ends.  To this end you have some knowledge and power over those non-human entities that empowered the sorcerer’s bloodline in the first place, possibly adding them to your list of existences to end.  
Blood Hunter
At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Arcana skill and Constitution and Charisma saving throws.  Your spellcasting ability score is Charisma.  
As a reaction, you can gain an unraveler point to gain resistance to any of the following damage types until the beginning of your next turn: fire, cold, lightning, acid, or thunder.   
As a bonus action, you can gain unraveler points to gain +1d6 force damage per unraveler point to a single melee, ranged, or cantrip attack made against a target with sorcerous spellcasting abilities or one of the following creature types, chosen at first level: dragon, celestial, fiend, elemental, fey.   This damage bonus may be added to an attack after the attack hits. You may gain up to your proficiency bonus in unraveler points in a single bonus action using this ability.  
You lose 1d4 unraveler points when you reduce a target with sorcerous spellcasting abilities or the creature type selected previously to 0 hit points, but to use this ability you must kill the target.   
Sorcerous Manipulation
At 7th level, you can gain unraveler points to do the following:
  • As a reaction, you can gain unraveler points to block the usage of sorcery points within 30 feet of you.  You must gain one unraveler point per sorcery point blocked.  
  • TBD
Sorcerous Drain
Beginning at 13th level, if sorcery points are expended within 30 feet of you, you lose one unraveler point per sorcerer point spent.  
19th level ability TBD


Mage Hunter
You hunt those who study the arts arcane, putting an end to their abuse of power,
Arcane Predator
At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the skill Arcana and Wisdom and Intelligence saving throws.  Your spellcasting ability score is Intelligence.  
As a reaction, you can gain an unraveler point to gain resistance to any of the following damage types until the beginning of your next turn: fire, cold, lightning, necrotic, thunder, or acid.
As a bonus action, you can gain unraveler points to gain +1d6 force damage per unraveler point to a single melee, ranged, or cantrip attack made against a target with wizard spellcasting abilities or one of the following creature types, chosen at first level: elemental, construct, or undead.   This damage bonus may be added to an attack after the attack hits. You may gain up to your proficiency bonus in unraveler points in a single bonus action using this ability.  
You lose 1d4 unraveler points when you reduce a target with wizard spellcasting abilities or the creature type selected previously to 0 hit points, but to use this ability you must kill the target.   
Bastion Against Spells
Beginning at 7th level, you can gain unraveler points to do the following:
  • As a bonus action, gain an unraveler point to grant an ally within touch range an immediate saving throw against against one ongoing spell affecting the ally.   An additional point can be gained to give them advantage on that saving throw.  
  • As a reaction when you succeed in a saving throw against a spell that your Spell Evasion applies to, you may gain two unraveler points redirect that spell at another target that is in range of the original caster.  The target of the redirected spell is treated as if he were the original target of the spell.  You do not gain unraveler points for the redirected spell.  
Dimensional Lock
At 13th level you can gain three unraveler points to block any attempts to teleport into or out of a thirty foot radius around you, or summon creatures into that radius.  This block must be sustained by concentration. Characters wishing to teleport into or out of this radius, or summon a creature inside it, must succeed at a Intelligence save against your spell save DC.  Failure means the teleport ability used is consumed but it is not successful.  
19th level ability TBD

Pact Breaker
Kills warlocks.
At 1st level, you gain proficiency Insight skill and Wisdom and Charisma saving throws.  Your spellcasting ability score is Charisma.  
As a reaction, you can gain an unraveler point to gain resistance to any of the following damage types until the beginning of your next turn: fire, cold, lightning, necrotic, or acid.
As a bonus action, you can gain unraveler points to gain +1d6 force damage per unraveler point to a single melee, ranged, or cantrip attack made against a target with warlock spellcasting abilities or one of the following creature types, chosen at first level: celestial, fey, fiend, or abomination.   This damage bonus may be added to an attack after the attack hits. You may gain up to your proficiency bonus in unraveler points in a single bonus action using this ability.  
You lose 1d4 unraveler points when you reduce a target with sorcerer spellcasting abilities or the creature type selected previously to 0 hit points, but to use this ability you must kill the target.   
7th level ability TBD
13th level ability TBD
19th level ability TBD


Unraveler Spell List

  • Cantrips
    • Disenchanting Bolt
    • Extinguish
    • Resistance
    • Shredding Ray
    • Unravelling Bolt
  • 1st Level
    • Bane
    • Detect Magic
    • Dispelling Strike
    • Inflict Wounds
    • Mage Armor
    • Magic Missile
    • Piercing Strike
    • Protection from Evil and Good
    • Sense Magician
    • Shield
  • 2nd Level
    • Golembreaker Strike
    • Hold Person
    • Lesser Cleanse Mind
    • Lesser Restoration
    • Magic Weapon
    • See Invisibility
    • Silence
  • 3rd Level
    • Counterspell
    • Dispel Magic
    • Feign Death
    • Magic Circle
    • Nondetection
    • Protection from Energy
    • Remove Curse
    • Track Magician
  • 4th Level
    • Banishment
    • Freedom of Movement
    • Invisibility Purge
  • 5th Level
    • Antilife Shell
    • Banishing Smite
    • Circle of Power
    • Dispel Good and Evil
    • Greater Cleanse Mind
    • Greater Restoration
    • Hold Monster
New Unraveler Spells
Disenchanting Bolt
  • Cantrip
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: 30 ft.
  • Components:
  • Duration: Instant
You fire a bolt of unraveling energy, inflicting 1d6 force damage on the target with a successful ranged attack roll.  If the target is a construct, undead, fey, celestial, fiend, or other innately magical creature, it takes 2d6 force damage.  The damage increases to 2d6/4d6 and 5th level, 3d6/5d6 at 11th level, and 4d6/6d6 at 17th level.  
Dispelling Strike
  • 1st level Abjuration
  • Casting Time: 1 bonus action
  • Range: Self
  • Components: S
  • Duration: Concentration, up to 1 minute
The next time you hit a creature with a weapon attack before this spell ends, they are struck with a burst of unraveling energy.  The target has disadvantage on Concentration checks resulting from the attack, and suffers +1d6 force damage.  Any 1st level spells active on the target end; if these spells are triggered by an attack, they end before they can activate.  
At Higher Levels. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 2nd level or higher, the damage increases by 1d6 for each slot level above 1st.
Extinguish
  • Cantrip
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: 30 feet
  • Components:
  • Duration: Instant
You end the effect of any of the following cantrips if the caster fails a Wisdom save against your spellcasting DC: druidcraft, light, minor illusion, prestidigitation, thaumaturgy.
Golembreaker Strike
  • 2nd level abjuration
  • Casting Time: 1 bonus action
  • Range: self
  • Components: S
  • Duration: Concentration up to 1 minute
The next time you hit a creature with a weapon attack before this spell ends, the target is struck with a burst of unraveling energy that tries to unmake their very being.  If the target is a construct, it suffers +1d12 force damage and ignores any damage resistances; otherwise the target suffers +1d6 force damage..  
At Higher Levels. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 2nd level or higher, the damage increases by 1d12/1d6 for each slot level above 1st.
Lesser Cleanse Mind
  • 2nd Level abjuration
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: Touch
  • Components: V, S
  • Duration: Instantaneous
Remove the charmed, stunned, or frightened condition from the target.
Greater Cleanse Mind
  • 5th level abjuration
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: Touch
  • Components: V, S
  • Duration: Instantaneous
Remove the charmed, stunned, and frightened condition and end all of the following spells affecting the target: confusion, modify memory, feeblemind.  
Invisibility Purge
  • 4th level abjuration
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: 120 feet radius
  • Components: V, S
  • Duration: Instantaneous
Any creature in range at the time of casting that is invisible must make a Wisdom saving throw against your spellcasting DC or become visible.  The source of the invisibility does not matter; invisibility, greater invisibility, or a monster ability are all purged.  
Sense Magician
  • 1st level divination
  • Casting Time: 1 bonus action
  • Range: 30 feet
  • Components: S
  • Duration: Concentration up to ten minutes
While this spell is active, you can use a bonus action to determine if a target in range has spellcasting abilities.  The target can resist the attempt if they are aware of it with a Wisdom save against your spellcasting DC.  If the save fails or the target does not resist you learn if the target has spellcasting abilities, the source of their spellcasting ability, and their highest level spell slot.  
Shredding Ray
  • Cantrip
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: 30 ft.
  • Components:
  • Duration: Instant
You hurl a penetrating ray of unraveling power at the target.  With a successful ranged attack, you inflict 1d8 force damage and remove all temporary hit points from the target.  The damage increases to 2d8 and 5th level, 3d8 at 11th level, and 4d8 at 17th level.  
Track Magician
  • 3rd level divination
  • Casting Time: 1 bonus action
  • Range: 30 feet
  • Components: S
  • Duration: Concentration up to one hour
While this spell is active, you can use a bonus action to determine if a target in range has spellcasting abilities or if such a target has passed through the area within the last 24 hours.  if the target is still present in range, they can resist the attempt if they are aware of it with a Wisdom save against your spellcasting DC.  If the save fails, the target does not resist, or the target is not present, you learn if the target has spellcasting abilities, the source of the spellcasting abilities, and their highest level spell slot.  If the target is not present, you learn the direction they left by and can track them duration of the spell.  You do not know their final location, only what direction they went they left the range of this spell at any given point.  
Unraveling Bolt
  • Cantrip
  • Casting Time: 1 action
  • Range: 90 feet
  • Components: S
  • Duration: Instant
You throw a bolt of unraveling force at the target, ripping at their natural magic aura.  With a successful ranged attack, you inflict 1d8 force damage and cause the target to have disadvantage on spell attack rolls until the end of its next turn.  The damage increases to 2d8 and 5th level, 3d8 at 11th level, and 4d8 at 17th level.